Top Ten Desserts in the World

Rasmalai

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Country: India 

Recipe: Rasmalai is an Indian dessert that originated in Odisha, on the east coast of the Bay of Bengal. Rasmalai, which translates to “nectar cream” in Urdu, is made from spongy balls of paneer (Indian cottage cheese) that are soaked in thick, reduced milk that resembles clotted cream. This subtly sweet dessert is always served chilled, and it gets an extra flavor boost from a sprinkling of ground cardamom and saffron. Depending on the recipe, Rasmalai is topped with slivered almonds, ground pistachios, or an assortment of dried fruit. Got Bored? Try this then

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Banoffee Pie

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Country: England

About: Banoffee pie is a relatively new addition to the dessert scene. In 1972, Ian Dowding and Nigel Mackenzie, the chef and owner of The Hungry Monk restaurant in Jevington, East Sussex created the beloved pie. In 1974, Dowding and Mackenzie published their recipe of Banoffee (spelled “banoffi” by the founders) pie in The Deeper Secrets of the Hungry Monk. The classic version includes a thick layer of caramel, whipped cream, and banana slices, all of which sit on a crumbled biscuit and butter base. It’s Absolutely Gorgeous !

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Oliebollen

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Country: Holland

Recipe: The translation of Oliebollen (oily balls) doesn’t do this Dutch dessert justice. Traditionally eaten to celebrate the New Year, these deep-fried doughnuts are filled with raisins and dusted in powdered sugar. Since 1993, there has been an Oliebollen competition held every year by the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Dagblad, with winners coming from all regions of the country.

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Basbousa

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Country: Egypt

Recipe: Although Basbousa can be found all over the Middle East, it is primarily associated with Egypt. This simple cake—which is dipped in a sweet syrup after it’s baked—is made from semolina, eggs, butter, and coconut. More experimental recipes may also include rose or orange blossom water, plus a blanched almond as garnish. Marvellous!

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Tangyuan (sweet dumplings)

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Country: China

About : Although Tangyuan are enjoyed year-round, they’re traditionally eaten on the 15th day of Chinese New Year, signifying the end of the celebrations. Made from glutinous rice flour, the sweet dumplings are boiled in water before they’re covered in a syrupy broth. These chewy balls can be filled with red bean, black sesame, or peanut, or simply served on their own.

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Baklava

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Country: Turkey

About : Although the exact history of Baklava is a bit murky, it’s widely believed that the Assyrians first created the dessert in the 8th century BC. The Ottomans adopted Baklava, perfecting the recipe into what we know today: paper-thin layers of phyllo dough encasing chopped nuts, drenched in syrup or honey. Baklava used to be reserved for the wealthy, and to this day a common Turkish expression is, “I am not rich enough to eat Baklava every day.”

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Suspiro de Limeña

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Country: Peru

About : Suspiro de limeña was first documented in 1818 edition of the New Dictionary of American Cuisine, where it was nicknamed the royal delight of Peru. Suspiro de limeña itself translates to “the sigh of a woman”—the sound one might make after trying this indulgent treat. The sticky-sweet dessert has a base of manjar blanco, Peru’s version of dulce de leche, which is then topped with a port wine-infused meringue and sprinkled with ground cinnamon. Yumm!

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Tres Leches Cake

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Country: Mexico

About : Anyone with a basic understanding of Spanish knows that Tres leches cake means serious sweet business. This creamy sponge cake highlights three kinds of dairy—evaporated milk, condensed milk, and cream. The origins of Tres leches cake have been widely disputed, but one popular theory is that Nestle Corporation printed the recipe on cans of condensed and evaporated milk cans in order to sell more milk in Mexico during the 1940s. Häagen-Dazs recently hopped on the Tres leches train, coming out with a special edition tres leches ice cream flavor in 2003.

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Po’e

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Country: Tahiti

About : Po’e, a fruit pudding of sorts, is one of Tahiti’s most popular desserts. Traditionally, Po’e was served during barbecues where it was wrapped in a banana leaf and baked in the fire pit. Po’e can be made with nearly any pureed fruit, from mangoes to bananas. The fruit is mixed with arrowroot or cornstarch, baked, then topped with coconut cream for a subtly sweet dessert.  WoW!

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Brigadeiro

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Country: Brazil

About : In 1945, Brazilian politician and military figure Brigadeiro Eduardo Gomes first ran for office. His good looks won him the hearts of women across Brazil, who began fundraising for his campaign by selling his favorite chocolate treats. Although Gomes ultimately lost the election, the chocolates became so popular that they were named Brigadeiro in his honor. Reminiscent of chocolate truffles, brigadeiros are made from sweetened condensed milk, cocoa powder, and butter. Soft and rich, the chocolate balls are rolled in chocolate sprinkles. It looks so uncomfortable, but it’s taste, you have to own this one first !!

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